Multi-Story: Sardis

The first three houses on this page were forerunners of Johnson’s more ornate Queen Anne houses.

Claire Kyle Short House (1874)

106 Franklin Street

Photograph by Jim Utterback, 2014

Photograph by Jim Utterback, 2014.

The Claire Kyle Short House is not on the National Register of Historic Places.  The house is listed in:  Research Paper:  Judith Holland, “A Pictorial Study of the Architecture of Andrew Johnson,” University of Mississippi, 1982. This listing indicates that it was built by Andrew Johnson.

Little is known except when it was built and the fact that John Wright Johnson (Andrew’s son) remodeled it in 1919.

The columns may have been added during the remodel to give it a Colonial Revival style.

John Gillian-Mary McCarter House (1884)

106 East Hightower Street

Photograph by Jim UItterback, 3/14

Photograph by Jim Utterback, 2014.

The John Gillian-Mary McCarter House is not on the National Register of Historic Places. The home is listed in:  Research Paper:  Judith Holland, “A Pictorial Study of the Architecture of Andrew Johnson,” University of Mississippi, 1982.

No other historical information is known about this house except that it was built by Andrew Johnson.

Hall-Henderson House (1894)

Corner of Dunlap & Court Streets

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback, 2014

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback, 2014.

The Hall-Henderson House is included here because it is a transitional style between Johnson’s L-shaped cottages and his Queen Anne/Victorian houses.  Johnson built three multi-gabled, one-story houses such as this one with a square pattern.  The others are the Goodwin House in Longtown and the Tait-Taylor House in Como.

This house has a wheel window in one of the gables and latticework in another.  It has a wrap-around, square porch with floor-to-ceiling windows and turned posts and balusters.  The entry door has a glass transom.

This house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982.  Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places:  "The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi."

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982. Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places: “The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi.”

Taylor-Wall-Yancy House (1899)

114  Sycamore Street

Photograph by John Johnson, 2013.

Photograph taken by John Claude Johnson, 2013.

The Taylor-Wall-Yancy House is one of Johnson’s show-place Queen Anne houses.  It has 4600 sq. feet with two-and-a-half stories and nine rooms.  The house has rose glass triple windows, and the entry door has a glass transom.  Next to the entry door is a decorative diamond-shaped window.  There is a wrap-around front porch with Ionic columns.  There is also a second story, two-bay porch decorated with large, square posts.  Some of the gables have stylized Palladian windows.

The National Register of Historic Places quotes Ana Gordon as saying, this house “…shows Johnson’s capable transition from L-shaped cottages to the more elaborate residences preferred at the turn-of-the-century.”  Gordon goes on to say this house shows a “…successful and graceful blend of Queen Anne and Colonial Revival elements.” (National Register of Historic Places:  “The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi,” 1984)

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982.  Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places:  "The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi."

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982. Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places: “The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi.”

Andrew Johnson family photograph.  Date:  Early 1900's

Andrew Johnson family photograph. Date: Early 1900’s.

William H. Alexander House (1900)

202 East Lee Street

Photograph taken by James H. Thornton, 2014.

Photograph taken by James H. Thornton, 2014.  Used with permission.

The Taylor-Wall-Yancy House is one of Johnson’s show-place Queen Anne houses.  It has two-and-a-half stories and nine rooms.  The house has rose glass triple windows, and the entry door has a glass transom.  Next to the entry door is a decorative diamond-shaped window.  There is a wrap-around front porch with Ionic columns.  There is also a second story, two-bay porch decorated with large, square posts.  Some of the gables have stylized Palladian windows.

The National Register of Historic Places quotes Ana Gordon as saying, this house “…shows Johnson’s capable transition from L-shaped cottages to the more elaborate residences preferred at the turn-of-the-century.”  Gordon goes on to say this house shows a “…successful and graceful blend of Queen Anne and Colonial Revival elements.” (National Register of Historic Places:  “The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi,” 1984.)

Kyle-John Curtis House (1901)

109 McLaurin Street

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

The Kyle-John Curtis House is perhaps Johnson’s most imposing Queen Anne house.  It features a two-story gallery that wraps around much of the house.  It is supported on the ground floor by paired, round columns with Ionic capitals resting on brick pedestals.  On the second story there are single columns.

There is also a small, two-story porch on the side of the house that has double and single columns.  The entry door has a glass transom with sidelights. Directly above it, the entrance on the second-floor porch has the same.

The house has many decorative windows including three round-arched windows in the front, a pair of windows with transoms, and in the gable ends there are small leaded-glass windows and Palladian ones as well.

The most distinctive feature of the house is the unusual octagonal, shingled tower with a steeply pitched tent roof.  The tower has a round-arched, keystone window, and the roof has a pyramid-shaped vent.  This and the Crenshaw House are Johnson’s most ornate houses.

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

Andrew Johnson family photograph.  Date:  around 1910

Andrew Johnson family photograph. Date: around 1910.

Shands-Johnson-Gates House-Gates’ Castle (1905)

305 South Main Street

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

Gates’ Castle is not on the National Register of Historic Places because the owner asked that it not be included.  It is a two-story, multi-gabled house that shows some Colonial Revival features.  There is a front porch that has been screened and a second-story balcony.  Decorative features include an oval window and various sized windows in the gables.

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

Andrew Johnson family photograph.  Taken around 1920

Andrew Johnson family photograph. Taken around 1920.

Ballentine-Bryant House (1905)

506 Butler Street

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

The Ballentine-Bryant House is multi-gabled and differs from Johnson’s other houses in three ways:  It is the only house he built with a porte-cochere; the only one with a squat, round tower topped by a conical roof; and the only rambling one-and-a-half-story house.  It is listed as having been built by “Johnson and Son,” so it is presumed John Wright Johnson worked on it as well.

The house is a mixture of Queen Anne and Colonial Revival styles.  The porch is irregularly shaped and has a flat roof and clusters of two or three Tuscan columns resting on stone pedestals.  Broad stone steps lead onto the porch.

This house has some of Johnson’s signature elements like a leaded-glass transom and sidelights. This house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982.  Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places:  "The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi."

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982. Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places: “The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi.”

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982.  Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places:  "The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi."

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982. Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places: “The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi.”

 

 

 

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