Batesville

Lee House (1888)

201 Booth Street

Photograph taken by John Howell, 1013.

Photograph taken by John Howell, 2013.

The Lee House is one of Johnson’s most ornamented houses.  It has a steeply gabled roof with a flat roof over the porch.  There is crudely cut jigsaw molding across the front of the porch under the eave.  The porch railing is made of intricately carved wood.  There are slender, square columns above the railing. The two front windows have elaborate ornamentation consisting of a diamond and floral carved wood panel. The entry door has two rectangular transoms over it.

This house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982.  Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places:  "The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi."

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982. Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places: “The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi.”

St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church (1895)

113 Panola Avenue

Photograph provided by John Howell, 2013.

Photograph provided by John Howell, 2013.

St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church is not on the National Register of Historic Places, but in 2013 it received an historic marker from the Mississippi Department of Archives and History recognizing its significance and verifying that it was built by Andrew Johnson.

The outside belies the beauty inside.  The interior shows Johnson’s architectural range.  The church is made of timber-frame construction with diagonal wood paneling.   It includes rafters crossing in the ceiling with the chancel separated from the nave by a Gothic arch and an elevated floor with a split railing.  A double, side-by-side window with a Gothic arch is at the back wall of the apse.

Three sets of triple windows are on each side of the building  and are topped by Gothic arched stained glass windows.

Photograph provided by John Howell, 2013.

Photograph provided by John Howell, 2013.

An interesting note: The furniture you see in these photographs was made by Bavarian woodcarvers who were POW’s during World War II at Camp Como. Photograph provided by John Howell, file photo for the Panolian, no date.

Photograph provided by John Howell, file photo for The Panolian. no date.

Photograph provided by John Howell, file photo for the Panolia, no date.

Photograph provided by John Howell, file photo for The Panolian. no date.

Photograph provided by John Howell, file photo for the Panolian, no date.

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