L-Shaped Cottages: Sardis

The first two houses listed are the forerunners to Johnson’s L-shaped cottages and his earliest residential construction work in Mississippi.

Ballentine-Seay House (1870)

Corner of Pocahontas Street & Carlee Street

Photographed by Jim Utterback,2014.

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

The Ballentine-Seay House is thought to be the first house Johnson built.  It is elaborately and delicately detailed from the window cornices to the chimneys, perhaps to showcase his design style.  The three-bay window and bulls-eye brackets on the entry porch along with the front door transom are hallmarks of his later houses.

This house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982.  Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places:  "The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi."

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982. Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places: “The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi.”

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982.  Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places:  "The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi."

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982. Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places: “The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi.”

Fairhill/Short’s Hill (1870)

203 Childress Street

Photograph taken by Judith Holland, 1980.  Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places:  "The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi."

Photograph taken by Judith Holland, 1980. Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places: “Fairhill/Short’s Hill.”

Fairhill/Short’s Hill is not Johnson’s typical L-shaped cottage design, but instead is a two-story, Italianate style.  Nonetheless, it incorporates what were to become Johnson’s signature design features such as sidelights and a segmented fanlight transom on the door. There are arched, bracketed windows with hooded molds on all the main windows.

This is the only home Johnson built with a prominent center gable.  The front gable is decorated with brackets much like the designs of A.J. Downing.

Fairhill/Short’s Hill was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.  (Note: The present entrance porch with roof and columns is not original.)

Unfortunately, by 2013, Fairhill had fallen into disrepair (see the last photograph in Fairhill section).

Photograph taken by Judith Holland, 1980.  Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places:  "The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi."

Photograph taken by Judith Holland, 1980. Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places: “Fairhill/Short’s Hill.”

Unfortunately, by 2013, when this picture was taken, Fairhill had fallen into disrepair.   Photograph taken by John Johnson & Mike Dorr.

Unfortunately, by 2013, when this picture was taken, Fairhill had fallen into disrepair.
Photograph taken by John Claude Johnson & Mike Dorr. 

Johnson-Tate Cottage (1873)

111 Stonewall Street

Photograph taken by Mike Dorr & John Johnson, 2013.  Used with permission.

Photograph taken by Mike Dorr & John Claude Johnson, 2013. Used with permission.

The Johnson-Tate Cottage was built as Johnson’s own home, and five generations of his family lived there for over 100 years.  It features a somewhat eclectic, L-shaped cottage style.  The front porch has hand-carved square, paneled columns with decorative brackets. There are several glass transoms (some using Johnson’s signature rose glass) over interior doors and the front door.

The original front door was massive and hand carved in walnut. The original screen door, believed to be the first in Sardis (see Bio), was a delicate design and is said to have been ordered from Chicago by Johnson for his home. (Keller/Everitt Letter, October 19, 1980)

This house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

Photograph taken The Southern Reporter, 3/19/92.

Photograph taken from The Southern Reporter, 3/19/92.

Andrew Johnson family photograph.  Date:  est. 1910 Photographer unknown

Andrew Johnson family photograph. Date: circa 1910, photographer unknown.

Rendering by Andrew Johnson showing cottage and grounds.  Date circa 1900.

Rendering by Andrew Johnson showing cottage and grounds. Date circa 1900.  Courtesy of John Claude Johnson.

Andrew and Anna Johnson are seated in front of their home.  Family photograph contributed by Gene Thornton.

Andrew and Anna Johnson are seated in front of their home with children around them. Family photograph  Courtesy of  Gene Thornton.  Probably taken around 1910.  Photographer unknown.

Andrew Johnson standing on porch of his home with wife and children.  Est. 1900.  Photographer unknown.

Andrew Johnson standing on porch of his home with wife and children. Probably taken around 1900. Photographer unknown.

R. J. Huftt Cottage (1884)

117 Pocahontas Street

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982.  Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places:  "The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi."

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982. Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places: “The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi.”

The Huftt Cottage was of the Vernacular Italianate style.  It featured a porch with highly decorated brackets on the columns.

Unfortunately, this house was damaged in a fire and was torn down after the mid-1980’s. This house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

Hall-Roberson Cottage-Magnolia Manor (1885)

510 South Main Street

Photo taken 2014.  Used with permission from Debbie Aldison Crye-Leike Realtors.

Photo taken 2014. Used with permission from Debbie Aldison Crye-Leike Realtors.

Magnolia Manor is one of Johnson’s most richly decorated cottages.  The gable is filled with shingles and has an arched inset with lattice-work.  There is a glass transom over the front door and others inside the house. A unique feature of the house is that the front door is set on a diagonal.

This house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

Hall-Roberson

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982.  Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places:  "The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi."

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982. Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places: “The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi.”

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982.  Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places:  "The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi."

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982. Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places: “The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi.”

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982.  Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places:  "The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi."

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982. Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places: “The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi.”

Hooper-Floyd House (1885)

The Hooper-Floyd House is mentioned in the National Register of Historic Places but not included because it currently has vinyl siding and has been altered from the original design.

Walton-Howry Cottage (1888)

308 South Main Street

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

The Walton-Howry House is an L-shaped cottage in the Italianate style.  It features a transom and side lights on the front door.

There are porches in the front and side of the house that have floor-to-ceiling windows.  The delicate porch posts have fan brackets.

This house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982.  Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places:  "The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi."

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982. Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places: “The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi.”

Captain Walton, his wife, daughter, and friend around 1900.  Photographer unknown.  Taken from The Panola Story, Andrew Johnson's Legacy to Panola County, April-June, 1982.

Captain Walton, his wife, daughter, and friend around 1900. Photographer unknown. Taken from The Panola Story, “Andrew Johnson’s Legacy to Panola County,” compiled from a research paper written by Judy Holland, April-June, 1982.

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