Other Towns

Byhalia, Mississippi

Byhalia Methodist Church (1906)

2511 Church Avenue

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982.  Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places:  "The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi."

Photograph taken by Pam Gruen, 1981. Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places: “The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi.”

The Byhalia Methodist Church in Marshall County is credited to both Andrew Johnson and his architect son, John Wright Johnson.

The building is late Gothic Revival style with a steeply pitched, gabled roof.  There is a tower over the entrance doors.  The tower continues upward into a framed belfry with arched openings, topped by a spire. The windows vary in size, but all have Gothic-like triangular headings.

The present belfry is a 1950 replacement of the original (see original below). The covered entry is also a new addition. Notice the original tower had two buttresses and round windows.

This church was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982.  Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places:  "The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi."

Photograph taken by Pam Gruen, 1981. Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places: “The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi.”

Johnson family photograph.  Date around 1910.

Johnson family photograph. Date around 1910.

Crenshaw-Longtown, Mississippi

J. T. Goodwin House (1896)

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

Photograph taken by Jim Utterback 2014.

The photo above is of the Tait-Taylor house. The J.T. Goodwin House was destroyed by fire, and there are no photographs of it available.  It is said to have been identical to the Tait-Taylor house in Como (shown above) and the Hall-Henderson house in Sardis.

Crenshaw House (1899)

212 East Missouri Avenue (MS 310)

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982.  Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places:  "The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi."

Photograph taken by Ana Gordon, 1982. Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places: “The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi.”

The Crenshaw House is perhaps Johnson’s most ornate multi-story home.  For this two-and-a-half story house, he drew from the Eastlake style of architecture.

The main feature is the front porch that wraps around three sides of the house. It has turned posts with cut brackets. Spindles are incorporated over the porch’s main entrance and in the porch decoration.

This is Johnson’s only known use of the Eastlake style. The house is basically Queen Anne style with its multi-gabled roof and large central chimney.

Many large windows are featured on each floor culminating in an arched window in the top gable bordered by two rectangular windows.

The entrance door of this house has an upper square glass panel and a rectangular transom above that.  There is a two-story bay window on the side of the house.

This house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

Kosciusko, Mississippi

Burton Potts House (1886)

Photograph provided by Thomas Craft.  Date unknown.

Photograph provided by Thomas Craft. Date unknown.

The Burton Potts House is not listed, but is mentioned by the National Register of Historic Places.  It was demolished in 1965.  According to the diary of a prominent citizen of Kosciusko, Judge J.A. Niles, it was built by Andrew Johnson. He wrote that it was “…a grand two-story house.” (Jason Niles Diary, 1814-1894)

Col. Chapman Anderson House (1886)

402 North Jackson Street

Photograph taken by James H. (Skeeta) Thornton, May 2014.

Photograph taken by James H. (Skeeta) Thornton, May 2014.

The Col. Chapman Anderson House has a generally symmetrical design. It has a recessed porch across the front and two gabled projections on each side containing two windows each.  The steps and entrance are placed off-center. There is a small side porch as well.

A small law office on the property is thought to have been built by Johnson.  It is rectangular in shape and has no embellishments except a small porch (see photograph below).

This house was added as an amendment to the National Register of Historic Places listing in 1985.

Photograph taken by Richard J. Cawthon, 1985.  Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places:  "The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi."

Photograph taken by Richard J. Cawthon, 1985. Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places: “The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi.”

Photograph taken by Richard J. Cawthon, 1985.  Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places:  "The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi."

Photograph taken by Richard J. Cawthon, 1985. Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places: “The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi.”

Law Office behind Chapman House.  Unknown if it was built by Johnson.  Photograph taken by Richard J. Cawthon, 1985.  Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places:  "The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi."

Law Office behind Chapman House. Unknown if it was built by Johnson. Photograph taken by Richard J. Cawthon, 1985. Used with permission from the National Register of Historic Places: “The Architecture of Andrew Johnson in North Mississippi.”

Other Buildings in

Various Cities

The following buildings are listed as having been built by Andrew Johnson in: “The Panola Story, Andrew Johnson’s Legacy to Panola County,” Panola County Genealogical and Historical Society (April-June 1982). This article is compiled from a research paper by Judith Holland.  They may also be mentioned in the Panola Star and/or The Southern Reporter newspapers.  Most of the dates are from the newspapers.

None of these buildings has been included on the National Register of Historic Places, and it is not known for certain Johnson built them. Some of them may be non-extant.

Coldwater:  Alliance Warehouse (1888)

Coffeeville:  Presbyterian Church (1905)

Crenshaw:  Old Spoke Factory (1894)

Crenshaw:  Old Oil Mill

Crenshaw:  Methodist Church (1909)

Crenshaw:  R.W. Bailey Building

Grenada:  Train Depot

Grenada:  Thomas House

Hernando:  R.P. Cooke House

Hernando:  George Banks House

Lexington:  Bank Building (1902)

Lexington:  Large Oil Mill (west of the town)

Lexington:  R.W. Bailey Store (1902)

Longtown: Breezy Hill: (see photo below)

Lula:  Lester House

Lula:  Store

Oakland:  Cotton Storehouse for Newberger Brothers (1896)

Oakland:  Methodist Church (1897)

Water Valley: North Main Methodist Church (1907)

 

Breezy Hill, home Johnson built two miles west of Longtown as a gift to his daughter, Martha Victoria Johnson & her new husband, Robert Lee Thornton (shown in photo).  Circa 1900. Family photograph courtesy of James H. Thornton & Cammie Rone.

Breezy Hill: House Johnson built two miles west of Longtown as a gift to his daughter, Martha Victoria Johnson & her new husband, Robert Lee Thornton (shown in photo). This house is not on the National Register of Historic Places. Family photograph (circa 1900) courtesy of James H. Thornton & Cammie Rone.

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